Field Experience

PSYC 4830 – Field Experience (3 credit hours)

Placement: GSU Counseling Center

Georgia Southern University

The aim of this training opportunity is to provide undergraduate students with education related to counseling and/or clinical psychology as well as to give practical experience through role-play and demonstrations. However, students are NOT able to provide or observe, at any point during this course, direct clinical services to clients. During this course, students will learn about theories of psychotherapy and counseling and will be taught basic counseling skills and have the chance to watch demonstrations of these skills and role-play them. This experience will likely be particularly beneficial for students interested in pursuing graduate work in Counseling or Clinical Psychology. Students may only take one semester of Field Experience at the GSU Counseling Center. In order to be eligible for Field Experience, students must be enrolled in the undergraduate internship course, PSYC 4730.  Once enrolled in the course, students may contact the Counseling Center to learn more about the application and selection process.

Field Experience Coordinator: TBD

Office Location: GSU Counseling Center

Contact Information: phone: (912) 478-5541

Meeting Time(s): TBA, chosen by student and coordinator

 

COURSE PREREQUISITES:

PSYC 1101 – Introduction to Psychology

PSYC 3330 – Abnormal Psychology

Text: Jeffrey Kottler’s Nuts and Bolts of Helping (Text will be provided)

Student should be majoring in Psychology or a related discipline with plans to work in a counseling/helping profession.

Counseling Center clients currently or previously in therapy with Dr. Williams for individual or group therapy are not eligible for this experience. Also, you may not be a client of the Counseling Center at the time of your Field Experience here. Work study students at the Counseling Center are also ineligible during their term of employment.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The aim of this course is to provide undergraduate students with education related to counseling and/or clinical psychology as well as to give practical experience through role-play and demonstrations. However, students are NOT able to provide or observe, at any point during this course, direct clinical services to clients. During this course, students will learn about theories of psychotherapy and counseling and will be taught basic counseling skills and have the chance to watch demonstrations of these skills and role-play them. This experience will likely be particularly beneficial for students interested in pursuing graduate work in Counseling or Clinical Psychology. Students may only take one semester of Field Experience at the Counseling Center.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Students are required to meet with the Field Experience Coordinator weekly for one hour per meeting. Additionally, students must be come to the Counseling Center for another hour to complete a weekly lab. Lab assignments will be left for student to pick-up in the Counseling Center Resource Room every week and are to be completed here. You will only have one week following the lecture to complete the lab; however, it will be kept in your journal and turned in at the end of the semester along with homework journal assignments.

You will not be required to turn in labs or journal responses at the end of the week. Rather, you will turn in the completed journal at the end of the semester with ALL assignments included. It would be wise to complete assignments when given, rather than waiting until the end of the semester. This ensures that your journal will be complete at the end of the semester AND, most importantly, will allow you to make the most of the discussed information. For each journal response, you should write 2 typed, single-spaced paragraphs. These paragraphs should be at least 8-10 sentences with Times Roman or Courier, 10 or 12-point font. While the assignments will be graded based on effort and thoughtfulness, grammatical and spelling errors are also taken into consideration. Be sure to proofread your assignments. If you are unsure about how to complete an assignment – ask! Your grade depends on it! An example of a completed journal exercise has been attached to serve as a guide, but questions are always welcome!

 

GRADING:

Attendance:

Students are allowed two unexcused absences of a scheduled meeting with the Field Experience Coordinator. Each additional absence will result in the lowering of your semester grade by one letter unless excused with a doctor’s note or other documentation verifying it was an emergency. This documentation should be provided as soon as possible. If you are unable to attend the regularly scheduled meeting time due to another obligation, notify the Field Experience Coordinator as soon as possible to reschedule for a different time that week. Additionally, tardiness will not be tolerated. If arriving late, please call to let the Field Experience Coordinator know this ahead of time. Three tardies will result in one absence.

Participation:

Each week, students will be asked read a specific chapter prior to meeting with the Field Experience Coordinator. Reading assignments ahead of time will thus be expected. A failure to do so could significantly decrease your ability to learn this material and will stunt the experiential components of the course. If you are unsure about an assignment, please ask!

Students will meet with the Field Experience Coordinator, formally or informally, at the mid-point and end of the semester to discuss their performance.

Grade Breakdown:

60% – Journal

40 % – Attendance and participation

 

MOCK RESPONSE JOURNAL

8-28-08

Response Journal p. 12, #6

Exercise: Ask trusted friends, family, and classmates for feedback on your personal attributes that might be most and least useful in your helping efforts.

After speaking with friends, family, and classmates, I noticed that I received the most positive feedback about being open-minded, caring, compassionate, assertive, and optimistic. I agree that these qualities are personal attributes of mine and may be very helpful for me in a counseling profession. Being open-minded will allow me to better understand clients and their presenting concerns. This open-mindedness will, hopefully, be noticed by the client and assist in exhibiting a caring attitude, and a caring attitude reveals empathy. My compassionate nature will be beneficial because it will reveal my desire to help in a non-judgmental way. I believe it is very important for clients to not feel judged in counseling; feeling judged could hinder someone’s desire to open up and really share his or her problems. While counseling is about being compassionate and empathetic, I also think assertiveness is an important component of helping. A counselor needs to be able to confront a client honestly, while still remaining supportive. Lastly, I feel that being optimistic about clients’ ability to change their lives is vital. A counseling job seems like it would be difficult to enjoy without this hopefulness!

The attributes I feel will be least helpful for me in a counseling profession are my impatience, periodic boredom with redundancy, being talkative and advice-giving, and being too analytical at times. My impatience and periodic boredom with redundancy may be linked. At times in life, I have noticed that I grow impatient and irritated by hearing the same problem over and over. This may be because I am an action-oriented person and enjoy seeing change and progress. However, because change can be a slow process, I think this attribute may be a challenge for me at times while helping someone. Since I enjoy talking with others, I must also be mindful of becoming chatty and/or advice-giving in therapy. I know that therapy is a time for clients to talk, and it’s important for a therapist to listen. Also, the therapist must be able to support and challenge a client at times, but it doesn’t seem like advice-giving is a good idea in counseling. Clients have most likely already tried the “easy way” so commonly suggested with advice-giving. Lastly, I’m aware that I enjoy being logical and analytical. This will need to be monitored because it will be important to examine a client’s feelings as well as employ problem-solving.

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Last updated: 3/8/2017

Counseling Center • PO Box 8011 Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-5541